Common Core Alignment

Common Core Alignment 2017-05-24T17:08:06+00:00

Hibakusha Stories has spent the last six years visiting schools of every sort throughout the United States. In that time, we have refined the way we customize and co-create curriculum. Within each curriculum there are opportunities for choice and differentiation. What remains the same is the reading and writing across a variety of texts in order to develop and communicate expertise. The purpose is personal empowerment and the chance to effect change.

Students are genuinely motivated, learn better and more deeply because learning takes place in a compelling context.  The Hibakusha Stories staff is available for continuous coaching and feedback throughout each project-based unit. More Info: Contact

Sample Performance Tasks include:

  • Explore meaning through the invention and performance of monologues
  • Share and make meaning of survivors’ stories by choosing and illustrating significant quotations. These are then organized for effect into a picture book.
  • Hone arguments in order to take part in a debate
  • Synthesize evidence from a variety of texts in order to represent it through art.
  • Collect evidence from a variety of texts (including visual, scientific, economic, technological and poetic) in order to create sophisticated questions that drive academic discussions.
  • Construct programs that compile data to be analyzed.
  • Create a plan for collecting data from across one’s city in order to inform the public of safety hazards.
  • Research in order to cite evidence in an original video Public Service Message.

Since we began visiting schools, the Common Core State Standards have been adopted by forty-three states, the District of Columbia, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The standards are “designed to be robust and relevant to the real world, reflecting the knowledge and skills that our young people need for success in college and careers” (CCSS Initiative 2010b). Below are some of the many standards that we address.

English Language Arts

Reading Standards for Informational Texts:

  • Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • Analyze a complex set of ideas or sequence of events and explain how specific individuals, ideas, or events interact and develop over the course of the text.
  • Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words in order to address a question or solve a problem.

Writing Standards:

  • Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.
  • Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.
  • Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.
  • Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.
  • Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the strengths and limitations of each source in terms of the task, purpose, and audience; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and over reliance on any one source and following a standard format for citation.
  • Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

Speaking and Listening Standards:

  • Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) in order to make informed decisions and solve problems, evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source and noting any discrepancies among the data.
  • Present information, findings, and supporting evidence, conveying a clear and distinct perspective, such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning, alternative or opposing perspectives are addressed, and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and a range or formal and informal tasks.
  • Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.

Literacy in History/Social Studies

Reading:

  • Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, connecting insights gained from specific details to an understanding of the text as a whole.
  • Evaluate various explanations for actions or events, and determine which explanation best accords with textual evidence, acknowledging where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • Evaluate authors’ differing points of view on the same historical event or issue by assessing the authors’ claims, reasoning, and evidence.
  • Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, as well as in words) in order to address a question or solve a problem.
  • Evaluate an author’s premises, claims, and evidence by corroborating or challenging them with other information.
  • Integrate information from diverse sources, both primary and secondary, into a coherent understanding of an idea or event, noting discrepancies among sources.

Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects

Reading:

  • Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of science and technical texts, attending to important distinctions the author makes and to any gaps or inconsistencies in the account.
  • Determine the central ideas or conclusions of a text; summarize complex concepts, processes, or information presented in a text by paraphrasing them in simpler but still accurate terms.
  • Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., quantitative data, video, multimedia) in order to address a question or solve a problem.
  • Evaluate the hypotheses, data, analysis, and conclusions in a science or technical text, verifying the data when possible and corroborating or challenging conclusions with other sources of information.
  • Follow precisely a complex multi-step procedure when carrying out experiments, taking measurements, or performing technical tasks; analyze the specific results based on explanations in the text.
  • Synthesize information from a range of sources (e.g., texts, experiments, simulations) into a coherent understanding of a process, phenomenon, or concept, resolving conflicting information when possible.

Writing in History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects

  • Write arguments focused on discipline-specific content.
  • Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/experiments, or technical processes.
  • Use technology, including the internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.
  • Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.
  • Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the strengths and limitations of each source in terms of the specific task, purpose, and audience; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and over-reliance on any one source and following a standard format for citation.
  • Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

For those educators who are concerned with their own evaluations using Charlotte Danielson’s rubric, Hibakusha Stories helps across all domains, but especially those below:

  • Setting Instructional Outcomes: All outcomes represent rigorous and important learning in the discipline. The outcomes are clear, written in the form of student learning, and permit viable methods of assessment. Outcomes reflect several different types of learning and, where appropriate, represent opportunities for both coordination and integration. Outcomes take into account the varying needs of individual students.
  • Demonstrating Knowledge of Resources: Teacher’s knowledge of resources for classroom use, for expanding one’s own knowledge, and for students is extensive, including those available through the school or district, in the community, through professional organizations and universities, and on the internet.
  • Designing Coherent Instruction: Plans represent the coordination of in-depth content knowledge, understanding of different students’ needs and available resources (including technology), resulting in a series of learning activities designed to engage students in high-level cognitive activity. These are differentiated, as appropriate, for individual learners. Instructional groups are varied as appropriate, with some opportunity for student choice. The lesson’s or unit’s structure is clear and allows for different pathways according to diverse student needs.
  • Creating an Environment of Respect and Rapport: Classroom interactions among the teacher and individual students are highly respectful, reflecting genuine warmth, caring, and sensitivity to students as individuals. Students exhibit respect for the teacher and contribute to high levels of civility among all members of the class. The net result of interactions is that of connections with students as individuals
  • Establishing a Culture for Learning: The classroom culture is a cognitively vibrant place, characterized by a shared belief in the importance of learning. The teacher conveys high expectations for learning by all students and insists on hard work; students assume responsibility for high quality by initiating improvements, making revisions, adding detail and/or helping peers.
  • Communication with Students: The teacher links the instructional purpose of the lesson to student interests; the directions and procedures are clear and anticipate possible student misunderstanding. Teacher’s explanation of content is thorough and clear, developing conceptual understanding through artful scaffolding and connecting with students’ interests. Students contribute to extending the content, and in explaining concepts to their classmates. Teacher’s spoken and written language is expressive, and the teacher finds opportunities to extend students’ vocabularies.
  • Using Questioning and Discussion Techniques: Teacher uses a variety or series of questions or prompts to challenge students cognitively, advance high level thinking and discourse, and promote metacognition. Students formulate many questions, initiate topics and make unsolicited contributions. Students themselves ensure that all voices are heard in the discussion.
  • Engaging Students in Learning: Virtually all students are intellectually engaged in challenging content, through well-designed learning tasks, and suitable scaffolding by the teacher, and fully aligned with the instructional outcomes. In addition, there is evidence of some student initiation of inquiry, and student contributions to the exploration of important content. The pacing of the lesson provides students the time needed to intellectually engage with and reflect upon their learning, and to consolidate their understanding. Students may have some choice in how they complete tasks and may serve as resources for one another.
  • Growing and Developing Professionally: Teacher seeks out opportunities for professional development and makes a systematic effort to conduct action research. Teacher seeks out feedback on teaching from both supervisors and colleagues. Teacher initiates important activities to contribute to the profession.